Riboflavin sources

The richest sources of riboflavin include organ meats such as liver, kidney and heart. Milk, yeast, cheese, oily fish, eggs and dark green leafy vegetables are also rich sources. Flour and cereals are enriched with riboflavin.

Riboflavin is stable when heated but will leach into cooking water. It is easily destroyed by light, and foods stored in clear containers will lose their riboflavin content in a short period of time.
Riboflavin sources Alkalis, such as baking soda, also destroy riboflavin.

Food

Amount

Riboflavin (mg)

Lambs liver, fried

100g

4.03

Almonds, blanched

1/2cup

0.98

Scallops, fried

6 pieces

0.85

Pink salmon, canned

1 can

0.84

Malted milk powder

4-5 tsp

0.75

All Bran

1/2cup

0.42

Spinach, cooked

1 cup

0.42

Milk, whole and skim

1 cup

0.40

Mackerel, cooked

1 fillet

0.36

Veal, cooked

100g

0.35

Wheatgerm

1/2cup

0.29

Lamb, cooked

100g

0.27

Pork sausages, grilled

100g

0.25

Eggs, boiled

1 medium

0.25

Milk chocolate

100g

0.24

Fruit yoghurt

1tub

0.23

Feta cheese

1 cup

0.23

Oats

1 cup

0.21

Beefsteak, grilled

100g

0.21

Green peas

1 cup

0.19

Soy milk

1 cup

0.17

 
 
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Riboflavin Categories:

Riboflavin
Riboflavin health
Riboflavin absorption
Riboflavin deficiency
Riboflavin sources
Riboflavin recommended daily
Riboflavin overdose
Riboflavin supplements
Riboflavin interactions

 


 

Other Vitamins:

Vitamin A
Carotenes
Beta carotene
Lycopene
Lutein
Thiamin
Riboflavin
Niacin
Vitamin B6
Folate
Vitamin B12
Biotin
Pantothenic acid
Vitamin C
Vitamin D
Vitamin E
Vitamin K