Coenzyme Q10 source

Coenzyme Q is found in all plant and animal cells. Some coenzyme Q10 is made in the body, particularly in the liver, and some is obtained from food. The production process is a complex one involving around 15 different reactions.
It is not clear how much coenzyme Q10 from the diet contributes to body stores, but evidence suggests that dietary coenzyme Q10 is an important source. The average person may consume around 5 mg of coenzyme Q10 per day.

The main coenzyme Q10 source are meat, fish and vegetable oils. Soybean, sesame and canola oils are high in coenzyme Q10. Wheat germ, rice bran and soybeans contain reasonable amounts of coenzyme Q10, but vegetables contain relatively little; although spinach and broccoli may be quite good sources.

 

 

 
 
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