Selenium sources

Good selenium sources of selenium include organ meats, fish and shellfish, muscle meats, whole grains, cereals, dairy products and vegetables such as broccoli, mushrooms, cabbage and celery. The selenium content of foods depends on the soil in which they are grown. Food processing techniques can remove selenium.

Food

Amount

Selenium (mcg)

Brazil nuts

6-8 kernels

840

Pork kidney, cooked

1 cup, sliced

271

Beef kidney, cooked

1 cup, sliced

212

Lamb kidney, raw

1 cup, sliced

185

Lamb liver, raw

1 cup, sliced

118

Tuna, canned, drained, in water

1 can

133

Tuna, canned, drained, in oi

1 can

130

Flounder, cooked

1 fillet

73.9

Pink salmon, raw

1/2 fillet

70.9

Macaroni pasta, dry

1cup

62.0

Oysters, cooked

6 oysters

60.1

Mackerel, baked

1 fillet

46.5

Pork, chops, sirloin

85g

43.9

Wheat flour, wholegrain

1/2 cup

40.3

Wholewheat pita bread

1 pita

28.2

Ocean perch, raw

1 fillet

27.7

Rolled oats

1 cup

26.2

White bread flour

1/2 cup

26.0

Wheat bran

1/2 cup

22.1

Wheatgerm

1/4 cup

21.9

Oat bran

1/2 cup

20.1

Special K

1 cup

19.2

Recommended dietary allowances

Men

Women

Pregnancy

Lactation

USA 70 mcg

55 mcg

65

mcg

75 mcg

UK 75 mcg

60 mcg

75

mcg

75mcg

Australia 85 mcg

70 mcg

80

mcg

85 mcg

Toxic effects of excess intake

Selenium toxicity can occur at doses of 600 to 750 mcg. Early signs of selenium toxicity include fatigue, irritability and dry hair. Other symptoms of excess intake include dental caries in children, hair loss, skin depigmentation, abnormal nails, vomiting, nervous system problems, and bad breath.

 
 
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Other Minerals:

Boron
Calcium
Chromium
Cobalt
Copper
Electrolytes
Potassium
Sodium
Chloride
Fluoride
Iodine
Magnesium
Manganese
Molybdenum
Nickel
Phosphorus
Selenium
Silicon
Sulfur
Vanadium
Zinc