Canker Sores

Canker sores (aphthous stomatitis) are small, painful ulcers that develop on the inside of the mouth, alone or in small clusters. They form when mouth acids and digestive enzymes eat away the soft tissue of the mouth. Canker sores can be caused or aggravated by certain foods—such as nuts, coconut, and chocolate— as well as by stress or minor mouth injuries. Unlike cold sores, canker sores cannot be spread from person to person.

As many as 50 percent of Americans get canker sores each year. For some reason, certain unfortunate people are far more prone than others to experience outbreaks, which usually last 4 or 5 days. Women are twice as likely to develop them, especially before their menstrual period begins. Most canker sores go away after a few days, but they recur in many people.

Canker Sores

 


 

Other Health Problems:

Calf Cramps
Cancer
Canker Sores
Capillary Fragility
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Cardiovascular Disease
Carpal tunnel syndrome
Cataract
Cavities/Tooth Decay
Celiac Sprue
Cervical dysplasia
Cheilosis
Cholesterol Problems
Chronic Ear Infection
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Circulation Problems
Colds and Flu
Cold Sores
Colon, Spastic
Colorectal Cancer
Common Cold
Congestive Heart Failure
Constipation
Crohn's Disease